Mercy

Mercy is a love that knows no boundaries.

In June our national newspapers all showed one particular picture taken at a Black Lives Matter event, which had descended from a peaceful protest into a violent riot between opposition groups and the police. The picture was of a black man carrying over his shoulder an injured white man, getting him out of trouble, to a safe place where he could be treated and cared for. The papers chased up this story, for among all the anger and violence it gave ‘a glimmer of hope’. A modern day good Samaritan.

In Luke’s gospel an expert on the law, questioned Jesus regarding what should be done to inherit eternal life. Jesus answered by asking him what was written in the law, and the man’s reply was:

“Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind and love your neighbour as yourself.” 

Luke 10:27

Jesus confirmed that he had given the right answer, but then the expert pushed the question further and asked, who is my neighbour? In reply Jesus told the story of a man – a Jewish man – travelling from Jerusalem to Jericho. On this lonely road the man was attacked, robbed, beaten and left for dead. But there were other people also travelling on the same road and the ones who would have been expected to stop and help him passed by on the other side. The person least likely to help, was a Samaritan – people whom the Jews looked down on and despised – and yet he was the one who stopped and put himself out to help, with considerable effort and personal expense!

Jesus then asked the expert on the law: “Which of these three do you think was a neighbour to the man who fell into the hands of robbers?” The man answers “The one who had mercy on him” Jesus replies “Go and do likewise”

For a long time I understood mercy to mean forgiveness and the withholding of a justly deserved punishment, but in this story, Jesus teaches that it is all that, but it is also much more than that….

Mercy is a love that knows no boundaries.

A love that reaches out, even with a small act of compassion, to those with whom one might strongly disagree, and has a powerful impact on all those who witness it!

Can we imagine the power to bring change, if we could be more merciful to one another?

This post is part of the Five Minute Friday writing community link-up, where we write for five minutes on a one word prompt. Today’s word is ‘mercy’.

Some of the other link-ups I join can be found here

8 thoughts on “Mercy

  1. Mercy is choosing not to punish a person when we have the ability to. Christ so aptly teaches mercy with this parable of the good Samaritan. He had every right to walk by the injured man, except because of the God. God is full of mercy, far beyond what I can understand.

    Amie, FMF #11

    1. Yes I think that, he would have been justified to walk by on the other side, but doesn’t and he doesn’t ‘just’ do the minimum but takes responsibility for the injured man, paying for his care until he recovers – so much to challenge us!

  2. One day my dying neighbour
    fell into rose-bush thorns;
    he called out for his Saviour,
    and the Mom of whom he’s born.
    He called as he lay bleeding;
    he wept, he was afraid
    that help that he was needing
    would not come, for he had AIDS.
    I could not stand his running
    on, so I gave impatient shout,
    that darn it, I was coming,
    and I pulled the blighter out,
    wearing neither mask not glove,
    counting on a shield of Love.

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